Sunday, March 8, 2020

buy custom Business Plan of Atrium Gallery essay

buy custom Business Plan of Atrium Gallery essay Atrium Gallery will upon its operations commencement sell a wide variety of luxurious and fancy dresses. This will provide the Russian women with dresses which are capable of suiting any occasion of choice. This business plan is to open a womens boutique shop which is supposed to deal with dresses for women who are above the age of 18 years. The boutique will be in rented premises in a shopping mall in a retail strip mall at 6253 Petrovka Street in Moscow city. The floor area of the business premise consists of 1,600 square feet and the shop will be in a very convenient location in the center of the Moscow city where the premises will be surrounded by restaurants, hotels, and several banks which shows that the business will be located where the customers are - in a very busy street. What will make us very unique and different from our close competitors is that our business will be very much committed to providing all the luxurious dresses for women who prefer fancy dresses of high qu ality, and they will be available for them in a location which is very convenient. The location of the business is in a very high profile area which is easily accessible from all the parts of Russia. In our business, there will be a total of 7 employees: director, legal front, accounting, marketing department, sales department, sales consultant (4 people) whose age is 20-45. Source of funding will be personal capital. The Atrium gallery will serve all the people from high income levels, middle, and low income levels, provided they are women who are above the age of 18 years and there is no upper limit. It is very expected that a majority of the customers of our business will be high class women with a high income, because all of the dresses that we will be making are be mainly for luxury, meaning that our most target customers will be high income women, since the fabrics we use for the dresses will be very unique and expensive for low income women, but of a very high quality and also very attractive and sophisticated. Buy custom Business Plan of Atrium Gallery essay

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Why Natural Farming is better than Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Research Paper

Why Natural Farming is better than Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) - Research Paper Example It was an excellent narration to illustrate the various sources of our food that can be had either from industrialized farms which utilizes GMO, to large scale organic farming to hunting (2006). In the same vein, the movie Food Inc by Robert Kenner Food Inc. demonstrates how industrial food makers through the massive use of GMO corn have altered our eating habits. Both the book and movie illustrated that industrial farm factory does not reveal the true cost of our food. While it may initially priced to be cheaper, the true cost is concealed in terms of undermining our health and the environment. This was more vividly illustrated in the movie Food Inc. where corn are also being fed to cows which is now fast becoming as part of our staple food causing us obesity and other health issues. The lethal contamination of E.coli that was induced by cows being in their manure during production was also illustrated with a kid dying just few days after consuming a contaminated burger. In effect, both Pollan’s book The Omnivore’s dilemma: a natural history of four meals and Robert Kenner’s movie Food Inc. illustrated that the source of our food is becoming a factory and is no longer grown the way it used to be. Worst, industrial farm factory and the use of GMOs are even packaged to be a better food source than organic farming (2008). Perhaps it was to illustrate the importance of organic farming over factory farming that uses genetically modified corn that Pollan showed his fascination on a farm where different species can be raised together in a theme of symbiosis (Pollan 126). The grower called himself a â€Å"grass farmer† to demonstrate that grass is the foundation of the intricate food chain. II. The rise of the Genetically Modified Organism agricultural products The debate over organic farming and Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) crop farming is still as intense when GMOs first caught the public attention. Each mode of farming the crop ar e pushing its advantage over the other as a better source of food with GMO gaining wider acceptance because of its putative efficiency in producing the crops. Genetically Modified Organism came to public attention in September of 2000 when the business section of the New York Times ran a frontpage story about an issue in the food supply. A new genetically engineered corn that contains a protein Cry9C which was supposed to be used as an animal feed was found in a nationally sold tacos (Kelso and Takahashi I). Despite of the issue, genetically modified crops have gained wide acceptance in the United States that it now contains more than 40% of soybeans, cotton and corn that is sold in supermarkets (Sakko). Crops have been modified to grow efficiently requiring fewer herbicides with some crops designed to be resistant to insects and pests. There were also crops whose genomes were altered to produce certain vitamins such as the Golden rice which has been said to contain Vitamin A. Genet ic alteration is not only limited to crops but is also used in trees and other animals (Sakko). III. The debate: why natural farming is better than Genetically Modified Organism? The most common reason used by the proponents of Genetically Modified Organism factory farming is that they are cheaper to produce and is a practical option to provide food to people worldwide (Royal Society of Chemistry). They are also said to be efficient because crops can be improved through genetic engineering to become more resistant to pests with an enhanced nutrient value at a lower production cost. Proponents of GMO’s are also highlighting the advantage of genetically improved crops to be more profitable because they can be grown faster. Proponents of organic farming on the other raised the advantages of organically raised foods over genetically

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

International Law - Refer to Order Instructions Essay

International Law - Refer to Order Instructions - Essay Example International Law in simple term refers to the law binding upon between Sovereign Nations. It is a set of rules and guidelines to be followed by nations of the world to maintain law , order , equality and justice among themselves. In other words , International Law comprises a system of rules and principles that govern the interactions between Sovereign States and other institutional subjects , such as International Inter  ¬Governmental Organizations . International law consists of rules and principles which govern the relations and dealings of nations with each other. International Law, which is in most other countries referred to as Public International Law, concerns itself only with questions of rights between several nations or nations and the citizens or subjects of other nations. In contrast, Private International Law deals with controversies between private persons, natural or juridical, arising out of situations having significant relationship to more than one nation. In recent years the line between public and private international law have became increasingly uncertain. Issues of private international law may also implicate issues of public international law, and many matters of private international law nave substantial significance for the international community of nations.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Relationship Between Politics and Sport

Relationship Between Politics and Sport Throughout history, sporting events have always reflected the political and social events that have surrounded them. Canada is not an exception to this fact. Political events such as the civil rights movement, the women’s rights movement, and various sporting events such as the Olympics have had a large influence on the world of sports. During the civil rights movement, many African athletes began to participate in sports to help transcend racial barriers. Willie O’Ree, the first black player to ever play in the NHL, was one of the figures that could be compared to Martin Luther King Jr. Willie O’Ree played for the Boston Bruins and his career was reflective of the Civil Rights Movement. In fact, â€Å" †¦one night in Chicago, ORee was butt-ended in the mouth by a Blackhawks player, who, as ORee was picking up his teeth from the ice, stood over him uttering a racist remark† (Burnett, 2007). O’Ree took this kind of abuse for his whole career, an d even though he was the first black player to play in the NHL, it took 30 years for the league to invite him to a single All-Star game (Burnett, 2007). The hate he received was immense, and his calm and quiet demeanor allowed him to ignore the derogatory terms was being called and continued to help contribute to the movement. As the movement began to prove successful in the 1960s, black athletes began to flourish as well. Fergus Arthur Jenkins, an African Canadian athlete who played in the MLB throughout the duration of the movement, was the epitome of the effects the movement had on the world. He is one of the greatest pitchers of all time, and one the less known figures during the time period (Fergie Jenkins Foundation). The main reason why I say he is a representative figure of the movement is because his career began right after the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Because of the dates of each event are so close, it can be assumed that Jenkins’ career and the bill symbolized a turning point in history in which people of African descent would begin to be treated as human beings. In addition to Ferguson Jenkins, Harry Jerome was another African Canadian athlete that stood out in his field and was also a symbol of the struggle black people had to go through before receiving proper treatmen t from others. Harry Jerome was born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1940 (Barris, 2008). He participated in numerous races throughout his career and set records in the 100m dash and a variety of other events (Barris, 2008). In 1964, he â€Å"participated in the Tokyo Olympics and won a bronze medal in the 100m – dash† (Barris, 2008). This event was very significant as it represented the recent successes of the civil rights movement and his scar symbolized all the hardship that black people had faced as they pursued their dreams to be seen and treated fairly. The civil rights movement produced many athletes of African descent and they in turn represented the world – wide movement. Some of these athletes – Ferguson Jenkins, Willie O’Ree, and Harry Jerome – symbolized the movement and were leaders in their own way. During the women’s rights movement, many of the participants challenged the views of society and changed the world for the better through politics and sports. The Edmonton Grads were a dominant women’s baske tball team and served as a symbol of the progress women have made throughout the movement. â€Å"Beginning as a high-school team, the Grads ruled womensbasketballfrom 1915 to 1940, winning 93% of their games and 49 out of a possible 51 domestic titles† (Macdonald, 2006). The dominance the team had over the sport was relatable to the expansion of women into other fields. For example, as the Grads began to win, women began working and factories and drifting away from the stay-at-home wife stereotype that had held them down for so long. The Grads were also quite relatable to the Famous Five. Since they were playing a sport that was considered to be masculine and trying to challenge that view, the Famous Five were challenging the law that prohibited women from working. After the Dominions Election Act was passed in 1920, women gained the right to vote in federal elections (Massicotte). After this event many women athletes began to truly shine and stand out in their sport. One of the many woman athletes that produced incredible results was Lela Brooks. Brooks won multiple championships in speed skating (Ferguson, 2008). Although she had such a long career, she began to find success in 1923, which was just three years after the passing of the Dominions Election Act. Another successful athlete that flourished after the bill was Ethel Catherwood. She was a member of the 1928 Olympic team and won a gold metal (Barris, 2008). Although, if there was an individual that embodied the women’s rights movement, Fanny Rosenfeld would be that person. Rosenfeld is the most accomplished woman athlete in Canadian history. She was the â€Å"top-ranked female sprinter in Canada, she was also ranked number one in the long jump, shot put, and discus in 1925, and won Canada’s first Olympictrack and fieldmedal (a silver) in 1928† (Marshall, 2013). Throughout the 20s, she challenged the idea that some sports should only be played by men. Many commentators would often say that â€Å"women should stick to sports such as swimming† (Marshall, 2013). To combat this stigma, Rosenfeld played other sports such as hockey and basketball (Rosenberg). To reach the point where women had equal standing with men in terms of sports, many contributions were needed. Some of those major contributions were the Edmonton Grads, the Dominions Election Act, and Fanny Rosenfeld. Without these individuals and events, life would be different for women all over the world. Many sporting events such as the 72 summit series, the 1980 boycott of the Olympics, and the 2014 winter Olympics held in Sochi were all affected by politics. In 1972, Canadian players from the NHL would face off against Russia in an eight game series office hockey (Wilson, 2004). This series mirrored political events occurring at the time as it was not just ice hockey, but a way to decide which political views were more dominant. Russia wanted to prove that communism was superior to democracy, and this opinion was shared by all players on team Russia. On the other hand, Canada believed that they would prevail and prove to Russia that a democratic government was superior. As the games unfolded, Canada won by a single game but realized the threat presented by Russia. In addition, this series was also representative of the war occurring at the time as it took place during the Cold War. These games of hockey would not only decide which country was better at developing talent, but also w hich government was far more effective. In addition, The 1980 Olympics also brought the issues created by Russia out into the forefront. In 1979, Russia invaded Afghanistan, and this did not sit well with President Carter of the United States (Bigelow, 2014). Carter issued a warning to Russia declaring that if they did not leave Afghanistan and return home, the United States would boycott the 1980 Olympics (Bigelow, 2014). Instead of returning, Russia decided to stay and defy the wishes of the US. Because of this, not only did the United States proceed to boycott the event, but so did Canada and a multitude of other countries (Hill, 1999). Later in 1984, Russia decided to boycott the Olympics in Los Angeles (Hill, 1999). The actions taken by both countries were heavily influenced by the Cold War that was occurring at the time. In recent years, the Sochi Winter Olympics were reflective of the views of society and Russia’s out-of-date thinking. In the last decade, society has b ecome more accepting of individuals who do not follow the norm. For example, there have been states in America that have been allowing homosexuals to get married. In Russia, a law recently passed that â€Å"prohibits individuals from promoting homosexuality to minors† (Domi, 2013). This law caused a major uproar in America, and many people wanted a boycott. This desire led to various protests across the United States (Domi, 2013). This outrage also affected athletes as they all insulted the service provided by Russia while they were competing to help support the cause. Many of them took pictures of the dirty conditions they were living in and posted them on the internet, such as dysfunctional toilets. Over the last century, there have been many national sporting events that have influenced and reflected their political surroundings. History and sports go hand-in-hand. Political events such as the Women’s Rights and Civil Rights Movement have all had an effect on Canadi an competition. Even during events such as the Olympics, politics still manage to affect competition. This will continue to be true for the next few years, and the next century. Works Cited Barris, T. (2008, February 18).Ethel catherwood- the canadian encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/ethel-catherwood/ Barris, T. (2008, March 24).Harry jerome the canadian encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/harry-jerome/ Bigelow, W. (2014, February 17).The failed u.s. boycott of the 1980 moscow summer olympics. Retrieved from http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-failed-u-s-boycott-of-the-1980-moscow-summer-olympics/5369121 Burnett, T. (2007, December 14).Willie ORee: The first black NHL player. Retrieved from http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Hockey/News/2007/12/07/4713520-sun.html Domi, T. (2013, December 18).Obama rightly joins political boycott of winter olympics. Retrieved from http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2013/12/russia-gay-rightslgbtsochiwinterolympics.html Fergie Jenkins Foundation. (n.d.).Fergie jenkins biography. Retrieved from http://www.fergiejenkins.ca/site/biography Hill, C. R. (1999). The Cold War and the Olympic movement. History Today, 49(1), 19. Macdonald, C. (2006, February 07).Edmonton grads the canadian encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/edmonton-grads/ Marshall, T. (2013, October 16).The history of canadian women in sport. Retrieved from http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-history-of-canadian-women-in-sport/ Massicotte, L. (n.d.).The evolution of the duties to be fulfilled by poll staff with regards to registration and voting on polling day and advance polling days, 1920 to 2012. Retrieved from http://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=resdir=cons/comp/evoldocument=introlang=e Rosenberg, D. (n.d.).Fanny bobbie rosenfeld. Retrieved from http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/rosenfeld-fanny Wilson, J. J. (2004). 27 remarkable days: the 1972 summit series of ice hockey between Canada and the Soviet Union. Totalitarian Movements Political Regions, 5(2), 271 280

Sunday, January 19, 2020

Mass-Observation, Microscopy, and the Everyday Essay -- Essays Papers

Mass-Observation, Microscopy, and the Everyday The everyday is an assimilation of fragmented happenings that are interwoven to manifest society. A general stereotype of society can not be drawn from a single fragment, but must be created through an examination of the relationships between individual pieces. Every fragment, no matter how banal, contributes to the understanding of the everyday. In order to study the everyday, the use of microscopy and Mass-Observation are essential because they provide a way of viewing the everyday in a way that is unfamiliar. Every minute atom is part of a whole intricate system of operations. Though the atom is minute, the way it interacts with the objects around it is important. Whether it is transmitting information, relaying information, or interacting with another atom, these inner-workings combine to create a functional system. In the everyday, the smallest of fragments is important to understanding society and what drives it through time. Interactions of fragments give insight into the general environment in which the fragment belongs. Formally, examiners of the everyday focused on studying society through large social structures. Simmel, one of the major theorists in German philosophy and social science around the turn of the century, views the everyday differently. He believes that the everyday can not be studied on the macroscopic level, but instead should be viewed at the microscopic level (Ben Highmore 37). Simmel emphasizes using microscopic investigations of interactions between fragm ents to gain insight into the everyday (Highmore 37). His project of ‘microscopy’ allows for the fragments of the everyday to be studied in a way that generalized society as a whole. ... ...nd analyzed. Though social microscopy it used to study the social aspect of the everyday, every fragment is important. Simmel stated â€Å"Even the lowest, intrinsically ugly phenomenon can be dissolved into contexts of color and form, feeling and experience which provide it with significance† (Highmore 39). It is through microscopy and Mass-Observation that the everydayness of society is studied in a way that is made unfamiliar. Works Cited - Bancroft, Angus. â€Å"Georg Simmel.† Introduction to Sociology. (Nov. 1998). 8 Nov. 2004 . - Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1970. - Highmore, Ben. Everyday Life and Cultural Theory. London and New York: Taylor and Francis Group, 2002. - Kafka, Franz. The Trial. New York: Schocken Books Inc., 1998. Mass-Observation, Microscopy, and the Everyday Essay -- Essays Papers Mass-Observation, Microscopy, and the Everyday The everyday is an assimilation of fragmented happenings that are interwoven to manifest society. A general stereotype of society can not be drawn from a single fragment, but must be created through an examination of the relationships between individual pieces. Every fragment, no matter how banal, contributes to the understanding of the everyday. In order to study the everyday, the use of microscopy and Mass-Observation are essential because they provide a way of viewing the everyday in a way that is unfamiliar. Every minute atom is part of a whole intricate system of operations. Though the atom is minute, the way it interacts with the objects around it is important. Whether it is transmitting information, relaying information, or interacting with another atom, these inner-workings combine to create a functional system. In the everyday, the smallest of fragments is important to understanding society and what drives it through time. Interactions of fragments give insight into the general environment in which the fragment belongs. Formally, examiners of the everyday focused on studying society through large social structures. Simmel, one of the major theorists in German philosophy and social science around the turn of the century, views the everyday differently. He believes that the everyday can not be studied on the macroscopic level, but instead should be viewed at the microscopic level (Ben Highmore 37). Simmel emphasizes using microscopic investigations of interactions between fragm ents to gain insight into the everyday (Highmore 37). His project of ‘microscopy’ allows for the fragments of the everyday to be studied in a way that generalized society as a whole. ... ...nd analyzed. Though social microscopy it used to study the social aspect of the everyday, every fragment is important. Simmel stated â€Å"Even the lowest, intrinsically ugly phenomenon can be dissolved into contexts of color and form, feeling and experience which provide it with significance† (Highmore 39). It is through microscopy and Mass-Observation that the everydayness of society is studied in a way that is made unfamiliar. Works Cited - Bancroft, Angus. â€Å"Georg Simmel.† Introduction to Sociology. (Nov. 1998). 8 Nov. 2004 . - Baudelaire, Charles. Paris Spleen. New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1970. - Highmore, Ben. Everyday Life and Cultural Theory. London and New York: Taylor and Francis Group, 2002. - Kafka, Franz. The Trial. New York: Schocken Books Inc., 1998.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Aging Population Effects on Health Care Essay

Health care is a fast evolving field with advancements of technology and treatment options growing every day. The delivery of care has grown and often shifts direction over the years to accommodate changing population demographics and needs of patients. Many factors play a part in the role of health care and medical treatment, one of those factors being population demographic changes. When the demographics of a population change it can cause adverse effects on the surrounding area in many ways, such as access to care, types of treatment needed to care for the population and the need for health care employees. In a particular population where the demographic is aging the dynamic and need for care begins to affect the health care system in a variety of ways. All health care entities involved play a role in ensuring the challenges and the needs of the population change are met. As the population demographic ages the impact on the delivery of care will be significantly altered, such as t he organization of care and how it is delivered, treatment options, long-term care, and health care coverage will all be affected in different ways. According to the Administration on Aging of the Department of Health and Human Services, approximately 13% of the people living in the United States are elderly as of 2011, which average to about 40 million people. The Department of Health and Human Services estimates that by the year 2030 this number will expand to 72 million making up for 20% of the population in the United States (Campbell, 2013). Another factor that affects the aging population demographic is the rapid rate of retiring Baby-Boomers, with almost 10,000 entering retirement every day over the next 16 years this number will continue to grow (Campbell, 2013). The increasing amount of people aging in the United States as well as all over the world means the focus of health care will shift from acute care to the treatment of serious chronic diseases and assisted living skilled and non-skilled medical care will be in high demand. The aging population also results in the growth and demand for an increase in health care services impacting the health care market in a way that increases cost for all health care entities, such as the individual patient, the federal government, individual states, hospitals, physicians, etc. Other impacts of the health care system will be the increase need for health care employees with  specific skill sets along with the need for additional health care settings to attend to the elderly population. When population demographics change such as aging, many health care related challenges begin to rise and must be addressed and overcome quickly to ensure the quality of care is not impacted. Some of these challenges in an aging population are the need for in-home medical care and assisted living, such as hospice care, skilled nursing facilities and other long-term medical care settings. The challenge these bring to the health care system as well as the aging population are the high financial cost of in-home support and increased difficulties recruiting the proper trained employees (Potter, 2010). Another challenge this specific population change is faced with is the increased cost of health care coverage. Most retirees and elderly population turn to the federal government health plan known as Medicare for his or her individual health care coverage, with the majority of the Baby-Boomer population turning 65 years old at a rapid pace, more and more Americans are qualifying for Medicare coverage. In recent years the cost of Medicare has raised, mainly impart to the increased cost of prescription medications and the consumption of the elderly population (Potter, 2010). With decreasing long-term care options and increasing health care cost the elderly population is faced with many challenges within the health care system. Ultimately the current state of the health care system in the United States must address the concern of the aging population and adapt to the needs of the elderly. In the current era of advanced technology, more and more elderly people are connected to the internet and have a wide variety of receiving health care information. As the health care market moves into a more diverse and technology driven state it is important to market these wellness programs as well as changes in health care coverage that will ultimately effect the aging population. Another way to address the challenges of the aging population is ensuring that individual patients receive the most up to date information regarding his or her health care coverage and diagnosis information. Individual patients, communities and society as a whole can bring together the focus on the aging population health care needs by promoting wellness programs and providing the support to health care facilities needed to face the aging popu lation’s challenges.

Friday, January 3, 2020

Its Time to Privatize Colombian’s Prisons - 2566 Words

The involvement of the private sector in the penal system, prima facie, could be seen as a rapid and low cost, high benefit solution to the most serious penal system problems such as lack of prisons spaces, poor condition within the prisons, and the state responsibilities of running prisons services adequately, by the figure of prison privatization. (Cavadino, M. and Dignan, J. 2007) The figure of contracting out has been well described by Cavadino and Dignan in their analysis of the prison privatization. This model involves the private sector in the penal system, by giving to it certain responsibilities, such as, auxiliary services, design and construction of prisons, basic custodial functions, or a set of above, which is named†¦show more content†¦Firstly, a careful analysis of the fact that the private sector, management of prisons could be seen, just as a business, where everything is looking for the most part a financial item, so that, may generated danger of lack accountability and transparency in the delivery of punishment to the prisoner. Therefore it is very important in this point, the labour of the state as a controller and overseer, supervising that the contractor fulfils its obligations in an appropriate and transparent manner. Second, analysis of competition between public and private sectors in terms of provision of services in the search for low cost and high benefit as part of the delivery of the sentence, Logan, C. argues that they face the same problems, and for that reason are in the ability to compete. â€Å"it is primarily because they are prisons, not because they are contractual, that private prison face challenges of authority, legitimacy, procedural justice, accountability, liability, cost, security, safety, corruptibility, and so on. Because they face no problems that are both unique and insurmountable, private prisons should be allowed to compete (and cooperate) with government agencies so that we can discover how best to run prisons that are safe, secure, humane, efficient and just†. (Logan, C. 1990) Under this approach, the competition between the two sectors can be legitimized, and beneficiaries to improve impressments, under the